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Bozeman Health starts construction of Adult Inpatient Behavioral Health Unit

"Now, we’ll be able to take care of our friends and family right here in our community instead of having to send them away."
Posted at 6:45 AM, Jun 10, 2024

BOZEMAN — Medical professionals at Bozeman Health Deaconess Regional Medical Center say they recognize the increased need for emergency mental health services in Montana. Now, construction has begun on a new unit that will create a safe, therapeutic environment for adults experiencing any type of mental crisis.

“Although there’s progress being made, we’ve got a long way to go,” said Rebecka Pearson.

Mental health therapist Rebecka Pearson is the founder of Yellowstone Wellness, a Bozeman-based practice she has owned since 2013.

In that time, she’s seen many positive changes when it comes to mental health services and crisis intervention.

“But it’s still not enough,” said Pearson.

One issue Pearson pointed out was the inconvenience folks experience who need in-patient mental health specialty care in Gallatin County.

“Every year I have a handful of patients that need to seek services outside of this general area for a higher level of care,” said Pearson.

That’s something we have not been able to provide in Bozeman.

“Until this new hospital program.”

Nicole Madden is the system director for behavioral health at Bozeman Health Deaconess Regional Medical Center. She says the team is pleased to announce the construction of the adult inpatient behavioral health unit.

This customized care space will serve up to 14 adult patients.

“It can be terrifying and isolating,” said Madden. “So having this space where they’re close to their family and close to home, that changes the perspective and experience for people experiencing a mental health crisis.”

Madden says folks in need of specialty mental health care in Gallatin County have to travel at least 130-135 miles to get help.

Now, we’ll be able to take care of our friends and family right here in our community instead of having to send them away,” said Madden.

This 9,100-square-foot unit has been carefully curated to create a calming, therapeutic environment for patients. A large construction project, but well worth it, Madden says.

The unit is slated to open in 2025.

Pearson says she hopes the hospital’s 14-bed program is a catalyst for new ideas and elevated care in Gallatin County for Mental Health.

“I hope this is just the start,” said Pearson. “I hope this inspires us to talk about it, talk about the stigma, and continue to build.”