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Teepees go up on Bozeman's Peets Hill in honor of Indigenous Peoples' Day

Indigenous Peoples' Day is Monday, Oct. 11
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Posted at 9:51 AM, Oct 10, 2021
and last updated 2021-10-11 13:35:19-04

BOZEMAN — A new installation is up at Peets Hill on Bozeman’s east side. Seven teepees are a part of a new temporary installation to celebrate Indigenous Peoples' Day on Monday, Oct. 11.

Perched up at the top of Peets Hill overlooking Bozeman, the large teepees were erected to symbolize the number seven, which is important to many Indigenous communities—seven teepees to recognize the seven Tribal reservations in Montana.

Mountain Time Arts commissioned the exhibit atop Petes Hill. The installation is meant to honor the contribution that American Indians have made in the region. Help from members of the Rocky Mountain Tribal Leaders Council erected the teepees which can be seen towering on Petes Hill.

“How do you use art to bring awareness to Indigenous people? A lot of people see beadwork, they see regalia, but it's rare that they see the teepees lit up,” said Jade Snell, project lead for Rocky Mountain Tribal Leaders Council and a member of the Little Shell, Crow, and Assiniboine nations.

Organizers say that the teepees will be lit up in different colors each night.

The teepees will be up on the south side of Peets Hill until the morning of Oct. 18, with the last night to catch the lights on Oct. 17.

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Organizers say that this is an important step to bring awareness of those Indigenous communities throughout Montana and highlight their impact throughout the state.

“Indigenous Peoples' Day for Indigenous Montanans would mean recognizing real history and education,” said Francesca Pine-Rodriguez, co-executive Director of Mountain Times Art and a member of the Crow and Northern Cheyenne nations.

“I think once people are educated of the history of Columbus, they would have a different perspective and want to celebrate the contribution, history, and cultures of Indigenous peoples,” Pine-Rodriguez continued.

Mountain Time Arts,Tribal Leaders Council, the City of Bozeman and Pretty Sheild Foundation will host an event commemorating Indigenous Peoples' Day on Monday, Oct. 11, starting 6:15 p.m.

Mountain Time Arts is also asking the community for donations to make installations like this possible. If you would like to donate, you can visit Mountaintimearts.org.