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Bozeman Help Center plans relocation to bigger facility to meet client needs

“Our current space does not match the work we do, so having a place that our team is proud to come to every day and serve our amazing clients is what we look forward to the most.”
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For more than half a century, the Bozeman-based Help Center has answered the call for those facing a mental health crisis or actively considering suicide.

But it's more than just a crisis hotline. The Help Center provides counseling for victims of sexual assault, and they provide supportive family services.

Kimmelin Hull is a supporter of the Help Center. She has utilized the services and says it means the world to her.

“We lost our son to suicide last year and for us, having a place to be honest and open is, I believe, a part of the solution,” said Hull.

That solution is to destigmatize mental health struggles and empower people to seek help.

“Last year, we served over 8,000 individuals across our programs,” said Mandy St. Aubyn, development and communications coordinator for the Help Center. “So, we have been bursting at the seams for years.”

St. Aubyn says they’ve been discussing the need for improved space for a long time. Now, their vision is coming to life.

“Our vision is to purchase the mental health campus,” said St. Aubyn.

This mental health campus near Bozeman Health Deaconess Regional Medical Center includes five acres and five buildings. The campus is valued at more than $4.7 million and is owned by Western Montana Mental Health.

The two organizations have agreed upon a reduced $3.1 million purchase price and a closing date of March 1, 2024, allowing the Help Center to launch a special fundraising campaign called “Answering the Call.”

Folks gathered on the new campus on Sept. 13, as the Help Center announced its need to raise as much as $4.5 million.

“Our current space does not match the work we do, so having a place that our team is proud to come to every day and serve our amazing clients is what we look forward to the most,” said St. Aubyn.

A new safe place for people to share their stories and seek the help they need.

“For our family—that’s been incredibly important to be able to gather with other people in a safe confidential space to talk about our very unique situation,” said Hull. “It’s important for everyone to know that help is available when they’re struggling.”

To learn more, you can visit the Help Center website, and if you or a loved one needs help, you can call the Suicide and Crisis Lifeline at 988 or the Help Center's crisis line at 406-586-3333.