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Montana rancher invents practical new version of jack-leg fence - KBZK.com | Continuous News | Bozeman, Montana

Montana rancher invents practical new version of jack-leg fence

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"If you can use something that was useless and make it useful, that to me is just a lot of fun," said rancher Brandon Richert. (MTN News photo) "If you can use something that was useless and make it useful, that to me is just a lot of fun," said rancher Brandon Richert. (MTN News photo)
They built a new kind of jack-leg fence, using sucker rods from oil fields and all reclaimed materials instead of wood. (MTN News photo) They built a new kind of jack-leg fence, using sucker rods from oil fields and all reclaimed materials instead of wood. (MTN News photo)
FAIRFIELD -

A few miles off the beaten path in Fairfield, the Richert family has built a lifestyle upon living sustainably.

"If you can use something that was useless and make it useful, that to me is just a lot of fun," said rancher Brandon Richert.

Brandon enjoys inventing but enjoys spending time with his family the most, which is what his most recent innovation involved.

"When we built this [fence], it was literally our family doing it," he said. "The three kids and [my wife and I]."

They built a new kind of jack-leg fence, using sucker rods from oil fields and all reclaimed materials instead of wood.

"The idea just kind of came to me seeing so much of it laying around," explained Brandon. "I thought I'd put it to use."

He used it to help with a common ranching issue; reducing the stress on calves and their moms while they are weaning, which can affect profits.

"This [fence] allowed them to be on the other side from each other so they could ease that stress a little bit."

Brandon's jack-leg fence has caught the attention on many in the ranching community.

That's because it has almost infinite advantages. It costs half as much as pipe, is cheaper than wood, and is extremely durable.

"It will last longer than anybody alive right now," explained Brandon.

It doesn't hurt the animals. "So far I've had every type of animal in here, nothing's ever been harmed." said Brandon.

And it also doesn't affect natural resources. "[You can] lay this stuff through a swamp and then go up onto hard rock without changing anything."

You don't need equipment to install it, and it is very adaptable. "I've never worked with anything that has this much strength and yet so much flexibility."

The Richert's pen is about 33,000 square feet, but he can design any size pen. The fencing can be used for farming, ranching, gardening or anything else.

"Anything anyone can dream up. Or let me dream up. I like doing that," said Brandon.

The Richert's have started a business now to build the fences and offer it to other. The biggest advantage though, they say, is being able to sustain their dream of being a close-knit family.

"Not only could we be together, but the kids can be pretty close to where we're working and they're still safe and getting to enjoy the outside," said Brandon's wife Chantel.

To visit the Richert's website, please click here.

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